City Chic Sindy wearing sunglasses
City Chic Sindy from the 2020 Collectors Range

I went ahead and bought City Chic Sindy, as a birthday present for myself. In my last post I wrote about how I discovered the newest range of Sindy, and although I loved all of them I wasn’t sure if I’d actually buy one. Well it didn’t take me long to decide, less than a week in fact, and I’m not at all disappointed.

City Chic Sindy is fabulous and as someone who makes small dolls’ clothes, I am very pleased with the attention given to the actual finish of her garments. Gosh, I would love the chance to visit the factory where they make these Sindy clothes!

I’ve not done much with my City Chic Sindy yet apart from taking her out of the box and checking out all the items that she came with. But it did give me a reason to practise more with making short videos and Sindy was a natural!

I love everything about her and I’m pleased I chose this particular Sindy doll.

She comes with sunglasses, handbag, shopping bag, and magazine.

Her outfit consists of cape, blouse, leggings and ankle boots (which I love).

She’s wearing earrings (that dangle) and a bracelet.

She is easily pose-able, her legs move very smoothly from the hips, as do her elbows and wrists. Her arms are firmer at the shoulder but still have a smooth action.

City Chic Sindy from the 2020 Collectors Range

I’ve not yet taken off the protective plastic headband as I’ll wait until I have the time to properly enjoy her, and so she’s back in her box for now. Meanwhile I’m thinking about the outfits I shall make for this doll and I especially like the original, vintage Sindy styles. I’m sure that will keep me occupied for quite a while!

My Little Miss Dressy raincoat fits her, so that’s a bonus.

So does my Little Miss Dressy’s knitted jumper!

For more ideas on Sindy, check out these folk:

Instagram – @my.sindydoll.world, @jollydollyshop, @sewsindy, @sindyobsessed, @sindycollectorsclub

Facebook – @Sindysalon16, @VintageSindy

All six Sindy dolls can be purchased from the Sindy Collectors Club website, and are currently price at £79.99

Kruseling dolls
Small Articulated Dolls – Under £25

Researching online for small articulated dolls sent me down a rabbit hole. I got totally lost and absorbed in vintage Sindy. So much so, that I spent hours on several websites, reading everything there is to know about Sindy.

Amanda Volley’s brilliant write up instantly transported me back to my childhood, triggering long forgotten memories. If only I had kept my Sindy!

Fast forward to now and I’m wanting to buy the newest Sindy, a fully articulated version, totally geared for the adult collector. Only I’m not a collector in the true sense; I simply love dolls of a certain type. They must be easily stored, poseable and realistic. Realistic in the sense that they are able to be handled, dressed, undressed and pose-able for regular adventures. I like a doll to be small enough to come on holiday with me without it taking up most of my carry bag.

I’m not sure if I’d want to do that with the latest Sindy though. Priced at £79.99, she’s too immaculate, smartly dressed and preened with a bit too much make-up, for travelling economy class. So, I took a step back and reminded myself of what I want in a doll, if I intend to buy one. It must be a small articulated doll under £25.

This video from Kid Kreations shows all six Sindy dolls from their Sindy Collectors Range that they launched last year.

I shall carry on searching for my vintage Sindy before I decide if I’ll buy the new 2020 articulated one. But thanks to Amanda’s post with lots of useful links, including Vintage Sindy, with great delight I’ve found and have started following @sindyobsessed, @sewsindy, @jollydolly and @sindycollectorsclub on Instagram. Anyone care to join me!

With the price of ball-jointed dolls these days, Kruselings offer very good value for less than £25. Although not true BJD, they are adequately articulated for realistic posing. They also fit well with economy-style travel, having been tested with my grandchildren of primary-school-age, albeit with my supervision.

If there is a downside to choose buying a Kruseling, it’s the lack of finding UK sellers of Kruseling dolls. Maybe it’s due to the dolls being readily available on Amazon. My latest purchase was Luna Kruseling (pictured below).

I purchased Luna via Amazon and was disappointed with the quality. Everything was perfectly good, apart from one of her legs. It looks like she has two right legs (knee to ankle, photo below). There is a distinct shape to left and right legs of Kruselings and I compared her to the others I have. They are OK but Luna’s left knee definitely points sideways, making that leg slightly longer than the right one.

I’m in two minds to contact Kathe Kruse in Germany to make them aware of this quality flaw but as I purchased from Amazon, I suppose that I should really complain to them. Meanwhile I don’t mind having a 2-right-legged Luna as these days I’m trying very hard to reel in my OCD of perfection!

If you’re looking to buy a Kruseling doll, I found three UK online sellers today with stock of Kruselings. Here they are:

  • NonsuchShop, with a bricks-and-mortar-shop in Devon and an online shop.
  • EvesToyShop, with a bricks-and-mortar-shop in West Wales and an online shop, and voted best independent toy shop in the UK for 2017/18.
  • My Doll Best Friend, with solely an internet-only shop.

Since owning a Kruseling doll I’ve developed a keen interest in ‘scene setting’. You only need to search Instagram for #Kruselings to discover lots of inspiration and I try my best to participate when the time allows it. Scene setting is popular for doll owners and their creativity never ceases to amaze me. Check out @windrose_dolls, @escapetodollworld, @thesunflowerfrog, @bellie_beth_baby, @my_other_world, @wandylovesdolls and @little_miss_dressy of course!

Back to the subject of reasonably priced, small articulated dolls. I’ve yet to check out the complete range of Made To Move Barbies. Although I’ve never been a big fan of Barbie dolls, these ones have definitely caught my eye. There are some great Instagram images showing the doll’s pose-ability and I especially like #barbiemadetomovecurvy and #barbiemadetomoveyoga. There’s certainly a wide range to choose from.

It was this ‘scene setting’ interest of mine that led me to vintage Sindy and where this story started. It’s hard to find interesting 1/6th scale accessories at a good price and Sindy popped up on my eBay search. There she was in all her glory, surrounded by her ‘scene setting’ accessories.

I have attempted to make some of my own accessories and so far I’ve made a garden seat, plates of food, doll’s bed, bean bag chair and slider sandals. All of these are detailed in previous blog posts.

Kruselings are 1/6th scale so I’m hoping that Sindy accessories will fill the gap (I currently have my eye on her yellow scooter). When I finally get to buy at a reasonable price then I shall let you know.

Small dolls cardigan knitting
Knitting for Small Dolls like Kruselings or MiniAmigas

Knitting for small dolls which are 1/6th scale, such as 9” Kruselings, 8” MiniAmigas and 11½” Barbies, is a very good way of using up leftover (or abandoned) yarn from knit or crochet projects. If you’ve ever knitted then it’s very likely you’ll have some wool at the back of a drawer or cupboard. The projects shown in this post use anything between 5 and 10 grams of double knit yarn. To give an idea of how much that is, the photo below shows 2 balls that together weigh 9.47 grams.

I recently rediscovered knitting, finding it to be a great way of not using my iPad of an evening while watching (or listening to) the TV. I can listen quite easily and with the summer months spent mainly outside in the garden, I got completely hooked on listening to audio books. Consuming books though earbuds completely eliminated any guilt I would have had if I’d sat, reading a hard copy. Anyway, if my garden needs tidying, I can’t sit out there to enjoy a book when I see the jobs that need doing.

So I started with the leftover yarn in my knitting bag and played around for hours trying to work out the best way to knit a small doll’s jumper. I didn’t have a pattern and eventually (thanks to YouTube) I’d worked out how to knit in-the-round. That was a complete game changer for me as I’d always knitted separate pieces and sewn them together. That’s fine for human size pieces but I was attempting 1/6th scale, first with double-knit yarn and then with three-ply crochet thread.

I progressed to knitting in-the-round from the hem up to the neck, followed by picking up stitches for the sleeves and then knitting those in-the-round. It looked OK, but it wasn’t the look that I was after. I didn’t want sleeves that stuck out at right angles from the shoulders, like the photo shown below.

I recalled how Fair Isle sweaters were knit from the neck down and so next I set about attempting this instead. There was plenty of trial and error before I worked out how best to increase neatly in stages. Once I had figured out the amount of stitches needed at the neck and then the body, I worked out when to increase and what to do for the sleeves. By this point I had lots of hand-written notes so I could remember what I had done, rather like an experiment but not so formal.

After several attempts, my experiment was complete and I had knitted my doll’s jumper with long sleeves in both double-knit yarn and 3-ply thread. I then used the same technique to knit a longer jumper for my Kruselings, followed by short sleeved versions. My mind was dizzy with all the possible variations.

Then I adapted the pattern to make a doll’s cardigan for knitting on two needles, with knitting in-the-round for the sleeves only. Doing this in both double-knit yarn and 3-ply thread, it showed me how different yarn affects the sizing. This can be seen in the photo below.

Here’s how knitting the dress version compares in double knit and 3 ply thread.

Unable to find a suitably sized knitting pattern for a basic jumper or cardigan (that fitted sixth scale dolls) I typed up all my notes, knitted everything again taking pictures of my knitting and created two knitting patterns. I’m happy to say that these are available to purchase as a pdf download from my website.

If you fancy having a go at reducing your knitting scraps and knitting for small dolls, then here’s the amount needed to get started;

3-Ply Decorative Thread
  • Long Sleeve Cardigan or Jumper – 7 grams
  • Short Sleeve Jumper – 5 grams
  • Tunic Dress Long Sleeves – 9 grams
Double-Knit Yarn
  • Long Sleeve Cardigan or Jumper – 9 grams
  • Short Sleeve Jumper – 7 grams
  • Tunic Dress Short Sleeves – 11 grams

It’s hard to judge the amount of wool needed but I had already invested in pocket weighing scales. These are perfect for knowing what my finished garments weigh for postage costs but now they also weigh my wool!

If you don’t fancy knitting for your own small size, 1/6th scale doll then please take a peek at the knitwear in my shop, listed in the Separates category. I’m delighted that what started as a way of not using my iPad in the evenings has ultimately produced the content for two basic knitting patterns, one for a dress/jumper and another for a cardigan. Even more delighted was I when I realised my creations also fitted Barbie, which makes my knitting pattern quite versatile.