Kruseling dolls bed
Making a Bed for a Small Doll (Kruselings)

Here’s how I went about making a bed for our Kruseling dolls, using lollipop sticks and a glue gun. Once I had worked out how to make it, it took me about an hour to cut and glue the pieces together. Initially there was more thinking than doing but after I had drawn the template the assembly was quite straightforward.

It’s not true 1/6th scale but it’s size was dependent on these 3 factors;

  • Long enough for a 9 inch Kruseling doll
  • Fit within the doll’s house room and still look realistic
  • Shallow enough to fit inside a 12 inch carry case.

Once I had decided on the size of bed I started the preparation;

  • Glue gun
  • Glue sticks
  • Measuring tools
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Eraser
  • Clippers
  • Weights
  • 11.5 cm long lollipop sticks (I used 41 sticks but allowed more for error)

Mark out the paper template

This is a rectangle measuring 11½ cm by 24½ cm (I used my quilter’s ruler to get the angles correct and I drew the rectangle).

Using a lollipop stick, draw around them to mark out their placements within the rectangle.

Cutting the lollipop sticks

There are 6 cuts in total using 4 lollipop sticks. Measure at the 8cm mark and cut 4 sticks to the 8cm length. Using 2 of the remaining 3.5cm pieces, measure 1cm from the cut end and cut to shorten the stick to 2.5cm. You will have 4 bed corner posts and 2 centre-bracing bed frame posts.

Assemble the Bed Frame

The template was used to line up the lollipop sticks and I used my sewing weights to stop the sticks from moving while I glued them together.

Start with the long sides and place a lollipop stick at each corner. Use another stick to overlap at the centre.

Using the weights to keep in place on the template, add the 2 ends to form a rectangle. Turn over and add 3 more vertical sticks (left, centre and right) for rigidity.

Using the paper template a a guide, continue adding vertical lollipop sticks to form the slats along the base. Also add 4 sticks horizontally at the sides.

Assemble the Bed Posts

Using the template, set the 8 cm long sticks at the correct distance apart and with weights in place, glue the horizontal sticks across.

The spacing is up to you, but the lowest stick needs to be situated so that the base is set at the correct height. Draw a line at 2.5 cm from the floor-edge.

Attach the Bed Frame to the Bed Posts

Place the bed post flat on the table and glue the bed frame to it above the 2½ cm line, ensuring it sits at right angles. Add more glue to the underside edge of the bed so that it’s not seen. Do the same for the 2nd bed post. Check that it all sits level.

Attach the Bracing Bar

With the bed turned upside down, glue one 2½ cm stick vertically to both sides at the midway point. Use a 3rd stick to form a bracing bar to help hold them in place.

At this stage I could see the bed was in its final stages and Sophia #Kruseling got to try it out.

Finish

There were glue strands that needed picking off and I tried as best I could to lightly sand any parts that required smoothing down. Then it was ready for painting! It got two coats of Liquitex Gesso and I left it with the matt finish.

After I had made the mattress, pillow and duvet I secretly wished I were that size, small enough to snuggle down in the bed next to Sophia.

With the prices of 1/6th scale beds these days, I was absolutely delighted to have been able to make my own. My 11½ cm lollipop sticks cost £1 for 100 and I used 3 or 4 glue sticks.

Three beds have been made so far, two are for Xmas presents (that fit in a little carry case with a Kruseling doll) and I get to keep one. I hope you feel inspired to have a go!

Party outfit by Little Miss Dressy
Small dolls cardigan knitting
Knitting for Small Dolls like Kruselings or MiniAmigas

Knitting for small dolls which are 1/6th scale, such as 9” Kruselings, 8” MiniAmigas and 11½” Barbies, is a very good way of using up leftover (or abandoned) yarn from knit or crochet projects. If you’ve ever knitted then it’s very likely you’ll have some wool at the back of a drawer or cupboard. The projects shown in this post use anything between 5 and 10 grams of double knit yarn. To give an idea of how much that is, the photo below shows 2 balls that together weigh 9.47 grams.

I recently rediscovered knitting, finding it to be a great way of not using my iPad of an evening while watching (or listening to) the TV. I can listen quite easily and with the summer months spent mainly outside in the garden, I got completely hooked on listening to audio books. Consuming books though earbuds completely eliminated any guilt I would have had if I’d sat, reading a hard copy. Anyway, if my garden needs tidying, I can’t sit out there to enjoy a book when I see the jobs that need doing.

So I started with the leftover yarn in my knitting bag and played around for hours trying to work out the best way to knit a small doll’s jumper. I didn’t have a pattern and eventually (thanks to YouTube) I’d worked out how to knit in-the-round. That was a complete game changer for me as I’d always knitted separate pieces and sewn them together. That’s fine for human size pieces but I was attempting 1/6th scale, first with double-knit yarn and then with three-ply crochet thread.

I progressed to knitting in-the-round from the hem up to the neck, followed by picking up stitches for the sleeves and then knitting those in-the-round. It looked OK, but it wasn’t the look that I was after. I didn’t want sleeves that stuck out at right angles from the shoulders, like the photo shown below.

I recalled how Fair Isle sweaters were knit from the neck down and so next I set about attempting this instead. There was plenty of trial and error before I worked out how best to increase neatly in stages. Once I had figured out the amount of stitches needed at the neck and then the body, I worked out when to increase and what to do for the sleeves. By this point I had lots of hand-written notes so I could remember what I had done, rather like an experiment but not so formal.

After several attempts, my experiment was complete and I had knitted my doll’s jumper with long sleeves in both double-knit yarn and 3-ply thread. I then used the same technique to knit a longer jumper for my Kruselings, followed by short sleeved versions. My mind was dizzy with all the possible variations.

Then I adapted the pattern to make a doll’s cardigan for knitting on two needles, with knitting in-the-round for the sleeves only. Doing this in both double-knit yarn and 3-ply thread, it showed me how different yarn affects the sizing. This can be seen in the photo below.

Here’s how knitting the dress version compares in double knit and 3 ply thread.

Unable to find a suitably sized knitting pattern for a basic jumper or cardigan (that fitted sixth scale dolls) I typed up all my notes, knitted everything again taking pictures of my knitting and created two knitting patterns. I’m happy to say that these are available to purchase as a pdf download from my website.

If you fancy having a go at reducing your knitting scraps and knitting for small dolls, then here’s the amount needed to get started;

3-Ply Decorative Thread
  • Long Sleeve Cardigan or Jumper – 7 grams
  • Short Sleeve Jumper – 5 grams
  • Tunic Dress Long Sleeves – 9 grams
Double-Knit Yarn
  • Long Sleeve Cardigan or Jumper – 9 grams
  • Short Sleeve Jumper – 7 grams
  • Tunic Dress Short Sleeves – 11 grams

It’s hard to judge the amount of wool needed but I had already invested in pocket weighing scales. These are perfect for knowing what my finished garments weigh for postage costs but now they also weigh my wool!

If you don’t fancy knitting for your own small size, 1/6th scale doll then please take a peek at the knitwear in my shop, listed in the Separates category. I’m delighted that what started as a way of not using my iPad in the evenings has ultimately produced the content for two basic knitting patterns, one for a dress/jumper and another for a cardigan. Even more delighted was I when I realised my creations also fitted Barbie, which makes my knitting pattern quite versatile.

Sofia Kruseling sat on her bean bag chair
Making a Bean Bag Chair for a Kruseling Doll 1:6 Scale

Making a bean bag chair for your Kruseling doll is quite straightforward and uses two pieces of fabric of exactly the same size. It can be made in under an hour and the trickiest part is filling the bag without spilling anything.

My inspiration sometimes comes out of nowhere; I recently had a clear out of old gift boxes and discovered some bags of tiny polystyrene beads that had been used as padding. It was these that gave me the idea to make my Kruselings their bean bags. I had no idea if there was enough but I thought I’d start with making one and see how much filling was left. It was mostly guess work by eye.

I started looking for a picture of a child-sized bean bag and came across a great blog post by Project Nursery that details how to sew one up. The child in the post’s photo looked about the same age as a Kruseling doll and so I used those measurements detailed in the blog post and divided by six to scale it down.

I drew out the pattern for a Kruseling doll bean bag as shown below. It’s a rectangle 7.5 inches by 5.5 inches, with one end curved.

To test if the size was correct, I first cut out the pattern using some plain cotton and sewed around three sides with a 1cm seam, leaving the shortest straight edge open. (Folding in the seam allowance and ironing the open edge at this stage helps for when sewing it up later.)

I filled up the bag to about one inch from the open edge. This left enough fabric to sew closed the seam and gave the right amount of bagginess to the bag. I machine sewed the seam closed, as near the edge as possible.

Happy with the size, after testing it out on Joy Kruseling, I made a cover for it in exactly the same way but hand-sewed the opening closed.

The key thing to remember is that the opening seam has to be twisted or off-set, like shown in the photo below; the side seams get brought to the centre.

I had enough filling to make three bean bags, so one for each of my Kruselings. If I were to make any more I think I’d try dried rice as the filling in place of polystyrene balls because no matter how careful I was, static made them dart everywhere.

One bean bag cover requires half a fat quarter but of course it’s not entirely necessary to make a separate cover for the bag because it’s twice the work, but it does give some flexibility for changing colour scheme whenever you like.

The bags were finished just in time to get a shot of the girls relaxing in the garden before the sun went down.

Joy, Sofia & Vera Kruseling